Writing About Copywriting

copywriting
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By Vanessa Rogers of TextBOX Conceptual

It’s always tricky for the content creator to write marketing material for his or her own business. We’re so used to compiling it on behalf of our clients. Here’s my stab at promoting what I do.

An article on Forbes.com resonates with me when it says: “Each piece of content signals a new opportunity for your business to connect with prospective customers.” This is because great content is the driving force behind any kind of online campaign.

What not all business owners seeking content know is that “content creation” and “copywriting” differ in several important ways. The former may send business your way, but its primary purpose is to tell people more about a topic – i.e. to position your chosen spokesperson as an industry leader in their respective niche. Copywriting, on the other hand, is intended to be more persuasive in that if it is well purposed – a clever advert, for example – potential customers are more likely to click through to that website and take advantage of the products or services the business has to offer.

What’s important to note is that content writing far outranks copywriting when search engine optimisation (SEO) is a key concern. The reasons include: higher reader value; subtle commercial intent, if you can find it in there at all among the topic thrust and opinions expressed; and because the text is longer in content creation than in copywriting, which should rank it higher on keywords than any short-form content. With this in mind when a new client comes my way, my first question tends to be which of the two types of content creation do you require; or, put another way, what are you aiming to achieve from my copy creation.

Another interesting question I’m often faced with is: how do you write so much specialised content when you aren’t professionally embedded within those industries? My answer: I’m embedded in all industries and can write for any business that prioritises good copy; doing my research is key. Before I begin on a piece of content for you, I will read extensively on the subject – selecting many top tier sources. A brief recorded chat with you, on Zoom, for example, will allow you to answer any pressing questions that I may have on your selected topic. I’m also likely to sprinkle a range of comments from you within the piece, as you are the expert – after all.

An astute marketing colleague recently asked me: “But Vaness, which type of writing do you prefer?” And my answer was: “I’m certainly no specialist. I do it all – from social media posts and high-level business pieces to quirky lifestyle blogs and everyday client op-eds. I even write copy for websites – my preference being those of entrepreneurs who are spurring on the economy by employing an increasing number of people as their product or service gains impetus.”

The life of a scribe is not an easy one. We do need to market ourselves from time to time (not only the work of our clients) and are not always sure whether we’re doing it effectively. But this past week I was asked by a prospective employee for a list of recent pieces I had written so that they could assess me for a long-term copywriting role. In this regard, having a blog and posting regularly on Twitter was a great help in sourcing that content.

Do get in touch at: textboxconservices@gmail.com